African Journal of Paediatric Surgery

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2012  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 22--26

Tube thoracostomy: Primary management option for empyema thoracis in children


Rajendra K Ghritlaharey, Keshav S Budhwani, Dhirendra K Shrivastava, Jyoti Srivastava 
 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Gandhi Medical College and Associated, Kamla Nehru and Hamidia Hospitals, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Rajendra K Ghritlaharey
Department of Paediatric Surgery, Gandhi Medical College and Associated, Kamla Nehru and Hamidia Hospitals, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh - 462 001
India

Aim: The aim of this study was to review our experience with tube thoracostomy in the management of empyema thoracis in children. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study included 46 children (26 boys and 20 girls) who were admitted and managed for empyema thoracis, between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010 at the author«SQ»s department of paediatric surgery. Results: During the last 12 months, 46 children aged below 12 years were treated for empyema thoracis: Five (10.86%) were infants, 22 (47.82%) were 1 to 5 years and 19 (41.30%) were 6 to 12 years of age. All the patients presented with complaints of cough, fever and breathlessness of variable durations. Twenty three (50%) children had history of pneumonia and treatment prior to development of empyema. Thirty five (76.08%) children had right-sided and 11 (23.91%) had left-sided empyema. Thirty nine (84.78%) children were successfully treated with tube thoracostomy, systemic antibiotics and other supportive measures. Seven (15.21%) children failed to respond with above and needed decortications. Most commonly isolated bacteria were Pseudomonas (n = 12) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 7). The average length of hospital stay in patients with tube thoracostomy was 15.35 days, and in patients who needed decortications was 16.28 days following thoracotomy. There was no mortality amongst above treated children. Conclusions: Majority of children with empyema thoracis are manageable with tube thoracostomy, antibiotics, physiotherapy and other supportive treatment. Few of them who fail to above measures need more aggressive management.


How to cite this article:
Ghritlaharey RK, Budhwani KS, Shrivastava DK, Srivastava J. Tube thoracostomy: Primary management option for empyema thoracis in children.Afr J Paediatr Surg 2012;9:22-26


How to cite this URL:
Ghritlaharey RK, Budhwani KS, Shrivastava DK, Srivastava J. Tube thoracostomy: Primary management option for empyema thoracis in children. Afr J Paediatr Surg [serial online] 2012 [cited 2023 Feb 1 ];9:22-26
Available from: https://www.afrjpaedsurg.org/article.asp?issn=0189-6725;year=2012;volume=9;issue=1;spage=22;epage=26;aulast=Ghritlaharey;type=0